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mythsandfolklore:

Coventina was a Romano-British goddess of wells and springs. She is known from multiple inscriptions at one site in Northumberland county of theUnited Kingdom, an area surrounding a wellspring near Carrawburgh on Hadrian’s Wall. It is possible that other inscriptions, two from Hispania and one from Narbonensis, refer to Coventina, but this is uncertain and disputed.

Dedications to Coventina and votive deposits were found in a walled area which had been built to contain the outflow from a spring now called “Coventina’s Well”. The well and the walled area surrounding it are nearby the site variously referred to as ProcolitaBrocolitia, orBrocolita, once a Roman fort and settlement on Hadrian’s Wall, now known as Carrawburgh.

The site near Coventina’s Well was excavated by British archaeologistJohn Clayton, in 1876.

Excavation of the site revealed several inscribed altars, some with depictions of Coventina in typical Roman nymph form.
Excavation also revealed a large quantity of coinage, from early Augustan coins to those of the late 4th century, and other votive objects such as brooches, rings, pins, glassware, and pottery. These are assumed to be votive offerings due to the quantity discovered in a single location.

(via mythology-and-art)

Filed under Carrawburgh Procolitia Coventina goddess senior thesis

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Mithras slaying the bull

The cult of Mithras was very popular with the Roman army, who brought it with them during their expansion northward in the first centuries AD. Mithraic temples have been found as far north as Carrawburgh on Hadrian’s Wall.

Mithras slaying the bull

The cult of Mithras was very popular with the Roman army, who brought it with them during their expansion northward in the first centuries AD. Mithraic temples have been found as far north as Carrawburgh on Hadrian’s Wall.

(Source: cheabraj)

Filed under Mithras Roman god cult Carrawburgh